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George Clasonr

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George Clason's

The Richest Man in Babylon

"Evolution is better than Revolution. New Thought Library's New Thought Archives encompass a full range of New Thought from Abrahamic to Vedic. New Thought literature reflects the ongoing evolution of human thought. New Thought's unique inclusion of science, art and philosophy presents a dramatic contrast with the magical thinking of decadent religions that promulgate supersticions standing in the way of progress to shared peace and prosperity." ~ Avalon de Rossett

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About George - Foreword - Historical Sketch of Babylon - The Man Who Desired Gold - The Richest Man In Babylon - p.20 - Seven Cures For a Lean Purse - First Cure - Second Cure - Third Cure - Fourth Cure - Fifth Cure - Sixth Cure - Seventh Cure - Meet the Goddess of Good Luck - Five Laws of Gold - The Laws - First Law - Second Law - Third Law - Fourth Law - Fifth Law - Gold Lender of Babylon - Walls of Babylon - Camel Trader of Babylon - Clay Tablets From Babylon - Tablet No. I - Tablet No. II - Tablet No. III - Tablet No. IV - Tablet No. V - The Luckiest Man In Babylon - Contents -


Chapter 7 - The Third Cure - p.39

Make thy gold multiply.

"Behold thy lean purse is fattening. Thou hast disciplined thyself to leave therein one-tenth of all thou earneth. Thou hast controlled thy expenditures to protect thy growing treasure. Next, we will consider means to put thy treasure to labor and to increase. Gold in a purse is gratifying to own and satisfieth a miserly soul but earns nothing. The gold we may retain from our earnings is but the start.

The earnings it will make shall build our fortunes." So spoke Arkad upon the third day to his class.

"How therefore may we put our gold to work? My first investment was unfortunate, for I lost all. Its tale I will relate later. My first profitable investment was a loan I made to a man named Aggar, a shield maker. Once each year did he buy large shipments of bronze brought from across the sea to use in his trade. Lacking sufficient capital to pay the merchants, he would borrow from those who had extra coins. He was an honorable man. His borrowing he would repay, together with a liberal rental, as he sold his shields.

"Each time I loaned to him I loaned back also the rental he had paid to me. Therefore not only did my capital increase, but its earnings likewise increased. Most gratifying was it to have these sums return to my purse. "I tell you, my students, a man's wealth is not in the coins he carries in his purse; it is the income he buildeth, the golden stream that continually floweth into his purse and keepeth it always bulging. That is what every man desireth. That is what thou, each one of thee desireth; an income that continueth to come whether thou work or travel.

"Great income I have acquired. So great that I am called a very rich man. My loans to Aggar were my first training in profitable investment. Gaining wisdom from this experience, I extended my loans and investments as my capital increased. From a few sources at first, from many sources later, flowed into my purse a golden stream of wealth available for such wise uses as I should decide.

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