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George Clasonr

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George Clason's

The Richest Man in Babylon

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About George - Foreword - Historical Sketch of Babylon - The Man Who Desired Gold - The Richest Man In Babylon - p.20 - Seven Cures For a Lean Purse - First Cure - Second Cure - Third Cure - Fourth Cure - Fifth Cure - Sixth Cure - Seventh Cure - Meet the Goddess of Good Luck - Five Laws of Gold - The Laws - First Law - Second Law - Third Law - Fourth Law - Fifth Law - Gold Lender of Babylon - Walls of Babylon - Camel Trader of Babylon - Clay Tablets From Babylon - Tablet No. I - Tablet No. II - Tablet No. III - Tablet No. IV - Tablet No. V - The Luckiest Man In Babylon - Contents -


Chapter 6 - The Second Cure - p. 37

Control thy expenditures.

"Some of your members, my students, have asked me this: How can a man keep one-tenth of all he earns in his purse when all the coins he earns are not enough for his necessary expenses?" So did Arkad address his students upon the second day.

"Yesterday how many of thee carried lean purses?"

"All of us," answered the class.

"Yet, thou do not all earn the same. Some earn much more than others. Some have much larger families to support. Yet, all purses were equally lean. Now I will tell thee an unusual truth about men and sons of men. It is this; That what each of us calls our 'necessary expenses' will always grow to equal our incomes unless we protest to the contrary.

"Confuse not the necessary expenses with thy desires. Each of you, together with your good families, have more desires than your earnings can gratify. Therefore are thy earnings spent to gratify these desires insofar as they will go. Still thou retainest many ungratified desires.

"All men are burdened with more desires than they can gratify. Because of my wealth thinkest thou I may gratify every desire? 'Tis a false idea. There are limits to my time. There are limits to my strength. There are limits to the distance I may travel. There are limits to what I may eat. There are limits to the zest with which I may enjoy.

"I say to you that just as weeds grow in a field wherever the farmer leaves space for their roots, even so freely do desires grow in men whenever there is a possibility of their being gratified. Thy desires are a multitude and those that thou mayest gratify are but few.

"Study thoughtfully thy accustomed habits of living. Herein may be most often found certain accepted expenses that may wisely be reduced or eliminated. Let thy motto be one hundred percent of appreciated value demanded for each coin spent.

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