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George Clasonr

Serving New Thought is pleased to present

George Clason's

The Richest Man in Babylon

"Evolution is better than Revolution. New Thought Library's New Thought Archives encompass a full range of New Thought from Abrahamic to Vedic. New Thought literature reflects the ongoing evolution of human thought. New Thought's unique inclusion of science, art and philosophy presents a dramatic contrast with the magical thinking of decadent religions that promulgate supersticions standing in the way of progress to shared peace and prosperity." ~ Avalon de Rossett

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About George - Foreword - Historical Sketch of Babylon - The Man Who Desired Gold - The Richest Man In Babylon - p.20 - Seven Cures For a Lean Purse - First Cure - Second Cure - Third Cure - Fourth Cure - Fifth Cure - Sixth Cure - Seventh Cure - Meet the Goddess of Good Luck - Five Laws of Gold - The Laws - First Law - Second Law - Third Law - Fourth Law - Fifth Law - Gold Lender of Babylon - Walls of Babylon - Camel Trader of Babylon - Clay Tablets From Babylon - Tablet No. I - Tablet No. II - Tablet No. III - Tablet No. IV - Tablet No. V - The Luckiest Man In Babylon - Contents -


Chapter 4 - Seven Cures For a Lean Purse - p.30

The glory of Babylon endures. Down through the ages its reputation comes to us as the richest of cities, its treasures as fabulous.

Yet it was not always so. The riches of Babylon were the results of the wisdom of its people.

They first had to learn how to become wealthy.

When the Good King, Sargon, returned to Babylon after defeating his

enemies, the Elamites, he was confronted with a serious situation. The Royal Chancellor explained it to the King thus:

"After many years of great prosperity brought to our people because your majesty built the great irrigation canals and the mighty temples of the Gods, now that these works are completed the people seem unable to support themselves.

"The laborers are without employment. The merchants have few customers. The farmers are unable to sell their produce. The people have not enough gold to buy food."

"But where has all the gold gone that we spent for these great improvements?" demanded the King.

"It has found its way, I fear," responded the Chancellor, "into the possession of a few very rich men of our city. It filtered through the fingers of most our people as quickly as the goat's milk goes through the strainer. Now that the stream of gold has ceased to flow, most of our people have nothing to for their earnings."

The King was thoughtful for some time. Then he asked, "Why should so few men be able to acquire all the gold?"

"Because they know how," replied the Chancellor. "One may not condemn a man for succeeding because he knows how. Neither may one with justice take away from a man what he has fairly earned, to give to men of less ability."

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