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George Clasonr

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George Clason's

The Richest Man in Babylon

"Evolution is better than Revolution. New Thought Library's New Thought Archives encompass a full range of New Thought from Abrahamic to Vedic. New Thought literature reflects the ongoing evolution of human thought. New Thought's unique inclusion of science, art and philosophy presents a dramatic contrast with the magical thinking of decadent religions that promulgate supersticions standing in the way of progress to shared peace and prosperity." ~ Avalon de Rossett

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About George - Foreword - Historical Sketch of Babylon - The Man Who Desired Gold - The Richest Man In Babylon - p.20 - Seven Cures For a Lean Purse - First Cure - Second Cure - Third Cure - Fourth Cure - Fifth Cure - Sixth Cure - Seventh Cure - Meet the Goddess of Good Luck - Five Laws of Gold - The Laws - First Law - Second Law - Third Law - Fourth Law - Fifth Law - Gold Lender of Babylon - Walls of Babylon - Camel Trader of Babylon - Clay Tablets From Babylon - Tablet No. I - Tablet No. II - Tablet No. III - Tablet No. IV - Tablet No. V - The Luckiest Man In Babylon - Contents -


Chapter 5 - The First Cure - p.34

Start thy purse to fattening.

Arkad addressed a thoughtful man in the second row. "My good friend, at what craft workest thou?"

"I," replied the man, "am a scribe and carve records upon the clay tablets." "Even at such labor did I myself earn my first coppers. Therefore, thou hast the same opportunity to build a fortune."

He spoke to a florid-faced man, farther back. "Pray tell also what dost thou to earn thy bread?"

"I," responded this man, "am a meat butcher. I do buy the goats the farmers raise and kill them and sell the meat to the housewives and the hides to the sandal makers."

"Because thou dost also labor and earn, thou hast every advantage to succeed that I did possess."

In this way did Arkad proceed to find out how each man labored to earn his living. When he had done questioning them, he said:

"Now, my students, ye can see that there are many trades and labors at which men may earn coins. Each of the ways of earning is a stream of gold from which the worker doth divert by his labors a portion to his own purse.

Therefore into the purse of each of you flows a stream of coins large or small according to his ability. Is it not so?"

Thereupon they agreed that it was so. "Then," continued Arkad, "if each of you desireth to build for himself a fortune, is it not wise to start by utilizing that source of wealth which he already has established?"

To this they agreed.

Then Arkad turned to a humble man who had declared himself an egg merchant. "If thou select one of thy baskets and put into it each morning ten

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