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George Clasonr

Serving New Thought is pleased to present

George Clason's

The Richest Man in Babylon

"Evolution is better than Revolution. New Thought Library's New Thought Archives encompass a full range of New Thought from Abrahamic to Vedic. New Thought literature reflects the ongoing evolution of human thought. New Thought's unique inclusion of science, art and philosophy presents a dramatic contrast with the magical thinking of decadent religions that promulgate supersticions standing in the way of progress to shared peace and prosperity." ~ Avalon de Rossett

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About George - Foreword - Historical Sketch of Babylon - The Man Who Desired Gold - The Richest Man In Babylon - p.20 - Seven Cures For a Lean Purse - First Cure - Second Cure - Third Cure - Fourth Cure - Fifth Cure - Sixth Cure - Seventh Cure - Meet the Goddess of Good Luck - Five Laws of Gold - The Laws - First Law - Second Law - Third Law - Fourth Law - Fifth Law - Gold Lender of Babylon - Walls of Babylon - Camel Trader of Babylon - Clay Tablets From Babylon - Tablet No. I - Tablet No. II - Tablet No. III - Tablet No. IV - Tablet No. V - The Luckiest Man In Babylon - Contents -


Chapter 1 - An Historical Sketch of Babylon - p. 8

In the pages of history there lives no city more glamorous than Babylon. Its very name conjures visions of wealth and splendor. Its treasures of gold and jewels were fabulous. One naturally pictures such a wealthy city as located in a suitable setting of tropical luxury, surrounded by rich natural resources of forests, and mines. Such was not the case. It was located beside the Euphrates River, in a flat, arid valley. It had no forests, no mines --- not even stone for building. It was not even located upon a natural trade-route. The rainfall was insufficient to raise crops.

Babylon is an outstanding example of man's ability to achieve great objectives, using whatever means are at his disposal. All of the resources supporting this large city were man-developed. All of its riches were manmade.

Babylon possessed just two natural resources --- a fertile soil and water in the river. With one of the greatest engineering accomplishments of this or any other day, Babylonian engineers diverted the waters from the river by means of dams and immense irrigation canals. Far out across that arid valley went these canals to pour the life giving waters over the fertile soil. This ranks among the first engineering feats known to history. Such abundant crops as were the reward of this irrigation system the world had never seen before.

Fortunately, during its long existence, Babylon was ruled by successive lines of kings to whom conquest and plunder were but incidental. While it engaged in many wars, most of these were local or defensive against ambitious conquerors from other countries who coveted the fabulous treasures of Babylon. The outstanding rulers of Babylon live in history because of their wisdom, enterprise and justice. Babylon produced no strutting monarchs who sought to conquer the known world that all nations might pay homage to their egotism.

As a city, Babylon exists no more. When those energizing human forces that built and maintained the city for thousands of years were withdrawn, it soon became a deserted ruin. The site of the city is in Asia about six hundred miles east of the Suez Canal, just north of the Persian Gulf. The latitude is about thirty degrees above the Equator, practically the same as that of Yuma,

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