NewThoughtLibrary.com

presents Autobiography of a Yogi by Paramahansa Yogananda, along with mp3's, eBooks and more...





Autobiography of a Yogi Paramahansa Yogananda

More New Thought Resources:

New Thought Library is an online public library with free eBook and audio downloads.
Links to downloads for Autobiography of a Yogi by Paramahansa Yogananda are at the bottom of this web page

"Unlike so many, we do not peddle the Divine word for profit."
~ 2 Corinthians 2:17

Read Autobiography of a Yogi by Paramahansa Yogananda free at NewThoughtLibrary.com

NewThought.NET/work

Serving New Thought is pleased to present

Autobiography of a Yogi

by Paramahansa Yogananda

"Evolution is better than Revolution. New Thought Library's New Thought Archives encompass a full range of New Thought media from Abrahamic to Vedic reflecting the ongoing evolution of human thought. New Thought's unique inclusion of science, art and philosophy contrasts with 'old thought' Religion. Today's 'New Thought 3.0' teaches personal responsibility, self-development, human rights and compassionate action as essential spiritual paradigms." ~ Avalon de Rossett



This library should make your reading, research and writing projects easier. Fully processed books have yellow page scan links to check text accuracy. File numbers for .jpg and .htm files etc... match the original page numbers for accuracy and ease of use. This enables writers to create reference links for research or publication. Use it, send in additions and keep in mind that your support means more free books, better processing and more downloads.

Your PayPal contributions insure this gift lasts forever. Please consider an ongoing PayPal subscription.

New Thought thinking is positive thinking on steroids

CHAPTER 17

Sasi and the Three Sapphires

"Because you and my son think so highly of Swami Sri Yukteswar, I will take a look at him." The tone of voice used by Dr. Narayan Chunder Roy implied that he was humoring the whim of half-wits. I concealed my indignation, in the best traditions of the proselyter.

My companion, a veterinary surgeon, was a confirmed agnostic. His young son Santosh had implored me to take an interest in his father. So far my invaluable aid had been a bit on the invisible side.

Dr. Roy accompanied me the following day to the Serampore hermitage. After Master had granted him a brief interview, marked for the most part by stoic silence on both sides, the visitor brusquely departed.

"Why bring a dead man to the ashram?" Sri Yukteswar looked at me inquiringly as soon as the door had closed on the Calcutta skeptic.

"Sir! The doctor is very much alive!"

"But in a short time he will be dead."

I was shocked. "Sir, this will be a terrible blow to his son. Santosh yet hopes for time to change his father's materialistic views. I beseech you, Master, to help the man."

"Very well; for your sake." My guru's face was impassive. "The proud horse doctor is far gone in diabetes, although he does not know it. In fifteen days he will take to his bed. The physicians will give him up for lost; his natural time to leave this earth is six weeks from today. Due to your intercession, however, on that date he will recover. But there is one condition. You must get him to wear an astrological bangle; he will doubtless object as violently as one of his horses before an operation!" Master chuckled.

After a silence, during which I wondered how Santosh and I could best employ the arts of cajolery on the recalcitrant doctor, Sri Yukteswar made further disclosures.

"As soon as the man gets well, advise him not to eat meat. He will not heed this counsel, however, and in six months, just as he is feeling at his best, he will drop dead. Even that six-month extension of life is granted him only because of your plea."

The following day I suggested to Santosh that he order an armlet at the jeweler's. It was ready in a week, but Dr. Roy refused to put it on.

"I am in the best of health. You will never impress me with these astrological superstitions." The doctor glanced at me belligerently.

I recalled with amusement that Master had justifiably compared the man to a balky horse. Another seven days passed; the doctor, suddenly ill, meekly consented to wear the bangle. Two weeks later the physician in attendance told me that his patient's case was hopeless. He supplied harrowing details of the ravages inflicted by diabetes.

I shook my head. "My guru has said that, after a sickness lasting one month, Dr. Roy will be well."

The physician stared at me incredulously. But he sought me out a fortnight later, with an apologetic air.

"Dr. Roy has made a complete recovery!" he exclaimed. "It is the most amazing case in my experience. Never before have I seen a dying man show such an inexplicable comeback. Your guru must indeed be a healing prophet!"

After one interview with Dr. Roy, during which I repeated Sri Yukteswar's advice about a meatless diet, I did not see the man again for six months. He stopped for a chat one evening as I sat on the piazza of my family home on Gurpar Road.

"Tell your teacher that by eating meat frequently, I have wholly regained my strength. His unscientific ideas on diet have not influenced me." It was true that Dr. Roy looked a picture of health.

But the next day Santosh came running to me from his home on the next block. "This morning Father dropped dead!"

This case was one of my strangest experiences with Master. He healed the rebellious veterinary surgeon in spite of his disbelief, and extended the man's natural term on earth by six months, just because of my earnest supplication. Sri Yukteswar was boundless in his kindness when confronted by the urgent prayer of a devotee.

It was my proudest privilege to bring college friends to meet my guru. Many of them would lay aside --- at least in the ashram! --- their fashionable academic cloak of religious skepticism.

One of my friends, Sasi, spent a number of happy week ends in Serampore. Master became immensely fond of the boy, and lamented that his private life was wild and disorderly.

"Sasi, unless you reform, one year hence you will be dangerously ill." Sri Yukteswar gazed at my friend with affectionate exasperation. "Mukunda is the witness: don't say later that I didn't warn you."

Sasi laughed. "Master, I will leave it to you to interest a sweet charity of cosmos in my own sad case! My spirit is willing but my will is weak. You are my only savior on earth; I believe in nothing else."

"At least you should wear a two-carat blue sapphire. It will help you."

"I can't afford one. Anyhow, dear guruji, if trouble comes, I fully believe you will protect me."

"In a year you will bring three sapphires," Sri Yukteswar replied cryptically. "They will be of no use then."

Variations on this conversation took place regularly. "I can't reform!" Sasi would say in comical despair. "And my trust in you, Master, is more precious to me than any stone!"

A year later I was visiting my guru at the Calcutta home of his disciple, Naren Babu. About ten o'clock in the morning, as Sri Yukteswar and I were sitting quietly in the second-floor parlor, I heard the front door open. Master straightened stiffly.

"It is that Sasi," he remarked gravely. "The year is now up; both his lungs are gone. He has ignored my counsel; tell him I don't want to see him."

Half stunned by Sri Yukteswar's sternness, I raced down the stairway. Sasi was ascending.

"O Mukunda! I do hope Master is here; I had a hunch he might be."

"Yes, but he doesn't wish to be disturbed."

Sasi burst into tears and brushed past me. He threw himself at Sri Yukteswar's feet, placing there three beautiful sapphires.

"Omniscient guru, the doctors say I have galloping tuberculosis! They give me no longer than three more months! I humbly implore your aid; I know you can heal me!"

"Isn't it a bit late now to be worrying over your life? Depart with your jewels; their time of usefulness is past." Master then sat sphinxlike in an unrelenting silence, punctuated by the boy's sobs for mercy.

An intuitive conviction came to me that Sri Yukteswar was merely testing the depth of Sasi's faith in the divine healing power. I was not surprised a tense hour later when Master turned a sympathetic gaze on my prostrate friend.

"Get up, Sasi; what a commotion you make in other people's houses! Return your sapphires to the jeweler's; they are an unnecessary expense now. But get an astrological bangle and wear it. Fear not; in a few weeks you shall be well."

Sasi's smile illumined his tear-marred face like sudden sun over a sodden landscape. "Beloved guru, shall I take the medicines prescribed by the doctors?"

Sri Yukteswar's glance was longanimous. "Just as you wish --- drink them or discard them; it does not matter. It is more possible for the sun and moon to interchange their positions than for you to die of tuberculosis." He added abruptly, "Go now, before I change my mind!"

With an agitated bow, my friend hastily departed. I visited him several times during the next few weeks, and was aghast to find his condition increasingly worse.

"Sasi cannot last through the night." These words from his physician, and the spectacle of my friend, now reduced almost to a skeleton, sent me posthaste to Serampore. My guru listened coldly to my tearful report.

"Why do you come here to bother me? You have already heard me assure Sasi of his recovery."

I bowed before him in great awe, and retreated to the door. Sri Yukteswar said no parting word, but sank into silence, his unwinking eyes half-open, their vision fled to another world.

I returned at once to Sasi's home in Calcutta. With astonishment I found my friend sitting up, drinking milk.

"O Mukunda! What a miracle! Four hours ago I felt Master's presence in the room; my terrible symptoms immediately disappeared. I feel that through his grace I am entirely well."

In a few weeks Sasi was stouter and in better health than ever before.1 But his singular reaction to his healing had an ungrateful tinge: he seldom visited Sri Yukteswar again! My friend told me one day that he so deeply regretted his previous mode of life that he was ashamed to face Master.

I could only conclude that Sasi's illness had had the contrasting effect of stiffening his will and impairing his manners.

The first two years of my course at Scottish Church College were drawing to a close. My classroom attendance had been very spasmodic; what little studying I did was only to keep peace with my family. My two private tutors came regularly to my house; I was regularly absent: I can discern at least this one regularity in my scholastic career!

In India two successful years of college bring an Intermediate Arts diploma; the student may then look forward to another two years and his A.B. degree.

The Intermediate Arts final examinations loomed ominously ahead. I fled to Puri, where my guru was spending a few weeks. Vaguely hoping that he would sanction my nonappearance at the finals, I related my embarrassing unpreparedness.

But Master smiled consolingly. "You have wholeheartedly pursued your spiritual duties, and could not help neglecting your college work. Apply yourself diligently to your books for the next week: you shall get through your ordeal without failure."

I returned to Calcutta, firmly suppressing all reasonable doubts that occasionally arose with unnerving ridicule. Surveying the mountain of books on my table, I felt like a traveler lost in a wilderness. A long period of meditation brought me a labor-saving inspiration. Opening each book at random, I studied only those pages which lay thus exposed. Pursuing this course during eighteen hours a day for a week, I considered myself entitled to advise all succeeding generations on the art of cramming.

The following days in the examination halls were a justification of my seemingly haphazard procedure. I passed all the tests, though by a hairbreadth. The congratulations of my friends and family were ludicrously mixed with ejaculations betraying their astonishment.

On his return from Puri, Sri Yukteswar gave me a pleasant surprise. "Your Calcutta studies are now over. I will see that you pursue your last two years of university work right here in Serampore."

I was puzzled. "Sir, there is no Bachelor of Arts course in this town." Serampore College, the sole institution of higher learning, offered only a two-year course in Intermediate Arts.

Master smiled mischievously. "I am too old to go about collecting donations to establish an A.B. college for you. I guess I shall have to arrange the matter through someone else."

Two months later Professor Howells, president of Serampore College, publicly announced that he had succeeded in raising sufficient funds to offer a four-year course. Serampore College became a branch affiliation of the University of Calcutta. I was one of the first students to enroll in Serampore as an A.B. candidate.

"Guruji, how kind you are to me! I have been longing to leave Calcutta and be near you every day in Serampore. Professor Howells does not dream how much he owes to your silent help!"

Sri Yukteswar gazed at me with mock severity. "Now you won't have to spend so many hours on trains; what a lot of free time for your studies! Perhaps you will become less of a last-minute crammer and more of a scholar." But somehow his tone lacked conviction.

+++

1 In 1936 I heard from a friend that Sasi was still in excellent health.
Back to text New Thought Books uplift the soul.

Support New Thought Library so that we can put more New Thought Media at your fingertips!

When errors are found in New Thought, then it evolves and that old New Thought is replaced with New Thought.   
In the late 20th Century, New Thought became riddled with false prosperity doctrines and a lack of compassion. 
The New Thought of the New Millennium leaves such delusions behind embracing a new paradigm

Links to Additional Media for Keep A True Lent by Charles Fillmore such as audio and ebooks are located at the bottom of this web page.

FindACenter.com

Discover a rainbow of exciting New Thought Communities around the corner and around the globe.

Find Fellowship

Divine Journal

Daily Wisdom from today's New Thought Leaders supports your Spiritual Journey with insights and affirmations.

Daily Wisdom

New Thought Talks

Interviews with New Thought Sharers around the world & explorations of current themes in New Thought

New Thought Talks




Great New Thought Resources:

A Powerful Collection of Spiritual Resources

We give you a powerful platform upon which to do God's Work learning and sharing New Thought:
DivineJournal.com, NewThoughtCommunity.com, NewThoughtTao.com and many more ...

New Thought Holidays

New Thought Day was declared by James Edgerton on August 23rd, 1915
During research while expanding the free New Thought Library, one of the ministers came across an interesting quote from early New Thought Alliance President James A. Edgerton: "'The truth, once announced, has the power not only to renew but to extend itself. New Thought is universal in its ideals and therefore should be universal in its appeal. Under the guidance of the spirit, it should grow in good works until it embraces many lands and eventually the whole world.' ~ New Thought Day, August 23rd , 1915."




NewThought.NET/work Serving New Thought

A growing collection of resources supported by a vast and expanding team of volunteers around the globe.

New Thought Radio

Talks by New Thought Spiritual Leaders
Uplifting Messages from New Thought Communities around the world.

Listen to New Thought Radio broadcasts from the New Thought Streams PodCast Archive, along with a growing collection of New Thought Music directly from New Thought Artists around the world.

Listen to New Thought Radio 24/7/365

New Thought Day
August 23rd

100 years old
1st declared by James Edgerton in 1915

"'The truth, once announced, has the power not only to renew but to extend itself. New Thought is universal in its ideals and therefore should be universal in its appeal. Under the guidance of the spirit, it should grow in good works until it embraces many lands and eventually the whole world.' ~ James A. Edgerton, New Thought Day, August 23rd, 1915."

New Thought Holidays August 23rd

DivineTao.com ~ since 2003

Be as water, as you are ...
The New Thought Tao

Explore the New Thought Tao and discover deeper wisdom. New Thought has many forms, Taoist New Thought brings insights to the table that are not so apparent in Abrahamic forms. While many Abrahamics fight to impose their views on the rest of the world. Taoist New Thought teaches the way of acceptance and understanding. Principles in the New Thought Tao provide powerful processes which serve as keys to deeper happiness and inner peace from the inside out.

Read Divine Tao #8 "Water" Tao #8

New Thought Conferences

Grow and thrive Share your truth

New Thought conferences from various New Thought denominations and organizations are happening all ove rthe world. Whether Old New Thought or New Thought Today, find conference info about New Thought Conferences!.

New Thought Conferences Share

New Thought Solutions

Conscious Ministry Grow and thrive!

New Thought Solutions for New Thought Sharers and New Thought Communities. Empowerment programs that awaken us to the co-creative "Power of We." Grow and thrive sharing a rainbow of New Thought wisdom with the world.

New Thought Solutions Thrive!

Books from contemporary New Thought Writers

NewThoughtBook.info

A growing collection of New Thought books from Today's New Thought Leaders. Many New Thought books lack the marketing necessary to get them in front of you, with New Thought Books INFO those writers to find you and you to find those writers...

New Thought Books Read!

Contribute to the Growth of the Library

Live your higher consciousness! Trust in the Divine! Do not falter in your steps to demonstrate higher consciousness. Success comes to those who are fearless in their commitment to their faith. Affirm Prosperity! Contribute Today!

To Build A Powerful Platform, begin with in.

In-tegrity entails Walking Our Talk, being an example by practicing what we teach!

click here for the page with links to e-book and audio downloads of Autobiography of a Yogi by Paramahansa Yogananda

eBook and audio downloads for Autobiography of a Yogi by Paramahansa Yogananda include: pdf, Open eBook, OEB, ePub & audio book MP3